REVIEW: Like Its Predecessors, Final ‘Resident Evil’ Film Is A Convoluted Mess Offering Little Entertainment

“Resident Evil: The Final Chapter” is supposedly the last picture in this franchise and hopefully that will remain the case.

The picture takes place after its 2012 predecessor, which ended with the premise that the final chapter would be a full defense of Washington D.C. from zombies. Like most “Resident Evil” movies, though, “The Final Chapter” completely disregards a previous film’s cliffhanger and through a bit of exposition the main character Alice is sent on a completely different adventure.

This time around, Alice (Milla Jovovich) has to make her way to Racoon City, the site of the second movie in the franchise, and find a cure for the dreaded virus that has turned nearly the entire population into zombies.

One thing that was instantly noticeable and also completely expected were the amount of plot holes and continuity errors that were scattered throughout this picture. For example, it’s explained (through a whole lot of exposition) that the sinister Umbrella Corp. wants to wipe out the remaining human settlements, but at the same time they want to rule the remaining world where only the strongest humans are left.

So, they want to wipe out the remaining survivors who were able to make it through the apocalypse even though they want to be in a world where the toughest humans remain. OK.

There are the little things, too. Such as one of the villains telling a computer program to set the evil hideout’s security to its highest setting, then telling it to do so again about 20 minutes later and again about 20 minutes after that. You know what the real kicker of that whole deal was? The main protagonists are able to walk through an entrance and the bad guy doesn’t decide to close the doors until after they’re inside.

It’s also apparent that this film wanted to have some cool action scenes just for the sake of having them, rather than them actually being integral to the plot. An example of this is Alice helping to defend a tower structure with other survivors from an army of zombies, even though she only has less than 48 hours to stop the remaining human settlements from being destroyed.

Why does she need to do this when she has only 48 hours? From the looks of the film, it’s because Director Paul W.S. Anderson wanted to do his version of a “Lord of the Rings” battle, but with zombies. Oh, and by the way, the 48 hours time limit is never explained.

It’s not as if you can expect a movie series that has kept its spotlight on a rather dull character this whole time to be that good, though. The first glaring issue is that Alice is not and has never been a character in any of the “Resident Evil” games, which the movies are based on.

Additionally, there’s just not much to her character at this point. She’s practically been just a standard action hero from start to finish, throwing a quip here and a punch there. The character simply leaves a lot to be desired in comparison to other action protagonists, such as Furiosa from “Mad Max: Fury Road.” Jovovich doesn’t add much to the role, either, being largely forgettable.

Even more unmemorable here, though, was the supporting characters featured. None of them are really developed and whenever one of them is killed off the reaction is just ‘meh.’

Issues with the characters, acting and story could be overlooked as typical B-movie schlock, though, if the action featured on screen was at least good. Unfortunately, that’s not the case here. The editing, for example, is atrocious, to the point where you can barely see what’s going on. Multiple fight scenes have too many cuts and the camera is zoomed in so close so that it’s hard to know how a fight is really going.

The final “Resident Evil” was about as bad as expected. The picture doesn’t work on any level and isn’t worth the time. 1 out of 5.

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Author: Matthew Liedke

My name is Matthew Liedke. I'm a reporter for the Bemidji Pioneer in Minnesota, but I also have a passion for the art of film. This passion led me to start writing about film in 2008. From 2008-2016 I wrote pieces at my own website, After the Movie Reviews. Then, from 2016-May 2018, my write-ups were featured on AreaVoices, a blog network run by Forum Communications Company. Today, I now write film reviews and other pieces here on Word Press. More about me: I'm a 2012 graduate of Minnesota State University Moorhead where I studied journalism and film. Outside of film, I enjoy sports, video games, anime and craft beers.

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