The Intern review

Director:
Nancy Meyers
Cast:
Robert De Niro
Anne Hathaway
Anders Holm
Rated: PG-13

In “The Intern,” Robert De Niro plays Ben, a senior citizen and widower who has become a bit bored in his retirement. He’s taken up hobbies and traveled to other countries, but still feels like there’s more to do. The movie picks up when Ben comes across an ad marketing an intern program for seniors at an online clothes store.

Despite not having much experience with today’s technology or the newest fashion trends, Ben throws his hat in the ring and gets picked up as a new intern at the business. While there, he is tasked with being an assistant to the company’s owner Jules, played by Anne Hathaway. Jules is a bit difficult to work with, though, as she’s under pressure to make a decision regarding hiring a CEO for the company.

“The Intern” has a quality that at times helps itself be watchable and in others hinders its chances at being very memorable. That quality is the overall pleasantness throughout the picture from beginning to end.

What works about the pleasantness featured in the “The Intern’s” heartwarming story is how easy it can win an audience over. For the most part, it’s a comforting tale to watch unfold, especially thanks to the charming performances of both lead actors. All together, it’s a feel good, fun story that is easy to enjoy for most ages.

As previously stated, though, this pleasantness from start to finish hurts the move too, as it practically prevents the story from exploring story points in more depth or even wrapping up important subplots.

For example, there are a few times in the first and second acts of the picture where the character Jules speaks about the difficulty in her relationship with her mother. In the third act, though, it’s almost as if this sub plot is completely forgotten and isn’t brought up again.

Even some parts of the story that are resolved by the closing credits seems to be done a bit too quickly. Without going into spoilers, I’ll just say that there were some moments that everything worked out a bit too perfectly. And a movie where everything turns out perfectly shouldn’t be two hours long.

The humor featured in “The Intern” was hit or miss for the most part. Some of the comedy was fairly witty and even some of the simple dialogue scenes had humorous undertones. At the same time, though, many of the jokes seemed to basically be “there’s an old guy trying to use a computer except he doesn’t know exactly how it works.”

What saves the whole movie are the performances by De Niro and Hathaway. Both of them are phenomenal on screen, each with their own personal charms as well as a solid chemistry between one another.

All of the scenes they share together feel real, genuine and honest which makes the movie much more enjoyable.

Simply put, “The Intern” could have used more depth and even more tension. Because of how well things seem to work out, the movie as a whole started feeling both bland and predictable. With that said, the movie still has some nice humor, the performances from the leads are solid and it will leave an audience happy. Low 3 out of 5.

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Author: Matthew Liedke

My name is Matthew Liedke. I'm a reporter for the Bemidji Pioneer in Minnesota, but I also have a passion for the art of film. This passion led me to start writing about film in 2008. From 2008-2016 I wrote pieces at my own website, After the Movie Reviews. Then, from 2016-May 2018, my write-ups were featured on AreaVoices, a blog network run by Forum Communications Company. Today, I now write film reviews and other pieces here on Word Press. More about me: I'm a 2012 graduate of Minnesota State University Moorhead where I studied journalism and film. Outside of film, I enjoy sports, video games, anime and craft beers.

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